Schutz Lake Subwatershed Plan

Minnehaha Creek Watershed District Schultz Lake

Minnehaha Creek Watershed District

Water Resources Management Plan

 

April 2007

1.0 Introduction and Summary

The Schutz Lake subwatershed is located along the southern boundary of the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District (MCWD or District) and within the City of Victoria.  A portion of the northwestern subwatershed is located within the Carver Regional Park Reserve, while the southern subwatershed contains lands that are part of the University of Minnesota Horticultural Research Center and Landscape Arboretum.  The lake dominates the northern subwatershed, with some residential development on its east side, while the southern subwatershed contains agriculture and scattered residential development.    Schutz Lake outlets into a large wetland that discharges to an outlet under Highway 7 into Lake Minnetonka,

Schutz Lake is close to meeting its water quality goals.   No current information is available regarding the fishery, but in 1991 a fish survey revealed a good pan and sport fishery.  Eurasian watermilfoil is present in the lake.  Few wetlands are present in the subwatershed, although wetlands riparian to Schutz Lake provide fish and wildlife habitat.

Over the next ten years, the District's focus in the Schutz Lake subwatershed will be on protecting and improving water quality in the lake as the upper subwatershed develops and conserving ecological integrity within the subwatershed.  The following will be particular focus areas:

  • Minimizing impacts on water resources from future development through enhanced regulation that requires higher levels of pollutant removal and increased infiltration of runoff.
  • Improving water quality through construction of improvement projects.
  • Conserving ecological integrity through wetland restoration activities in key conservation areas.

2.0 Land and Water Resources Inventory

2.1 Location

The Schutz Lake subwatershed is located along the southern boundary of the MCWD and within the City of Victoria (see Figure 1).  The subwatershed is 969 acres in size (1.5 square miles).

2.2 Physical Environment

2.2.1 Topography and Drainage

The Schutz Lake subwatershed is located within the Lonsdale-Lerdal till region, and the topography is typical of that region - rolling and hilly with steep slopes abutting Schutz Lake and the wetland on the north.

The HHPLS subdivided the subwatershed into four subwatershed units, designated SL-1 through SL-4 (see Figure 2). Each subwatershed unit flows to the north, and the subwatershed discharges into an outlet under Highway 7 into Lake Minnetonka.

2.2.2 Geology and Soils

The depth to bedrock within the subwatershed varies from 300 to 400 feet. Quaternary deposits - the surficial material overlaying the bedrock - are high relief New Ulm loamy till, with areas of clayey silt in the south and pockets of peaty muck in low lying areas. Soils within the watershed are predominantly Natural Resources Conservation Service Hydrologic Soil Group B (loamy soils with moderate infiltration potential) (see Figure 3). Group D (clayey soils with very low infiltration potential) soils are found in low-lying areas and are generally hydric, or showing indications of inundation (see Figure 4).

2.2.3 Unique Features and Scenic Areas

A portion of the northwestern subwatershed is located within the Carver Regional Park Reserve (see Figure 6). The southern subwatershed contains some lands that are part of the University of Minnesota Horticultural Research Center and Landscape Arboretum. The Minnesota Historic Features database notes a cluster of historic features in the subwatershed, all of which are associated with the Research Center.

2.3 Biological Environment

2.3.1 Vegetation

The subwatershed is bisected by Highway 5. The lake dominates the north, with the forest and woodland and grasslands of the Carver Park Reserve to the west and residential areas with low to medium impervious surface to the east. Land cover as classified by the Minnesota Land Cover Classification System (MLCCS) is illustrated in Figure 5a and Figure 5b. The southern half of the subwatershed is maintained or natural grassland and agriculture with scattered residential development.

2.3.2 Biologic Integrity

Landscape

Within the Carver Park Reserve on the west side of the lake is a large patch of maple-basswood forest that has been designated on the Minnesota County Biological Survey as being a high-value native plant community. The larger area within Carver Park Reserve has been designated by the DNR as a regionally significant ecological area within the Metro area. This designation is based on an evaluation of the size of the area, the diversity of cover types, and its location

Lakes

The most recent DNR fish survey of Schutz Lake was conducted in 1991. At that time the fish population was dominated by bluegill, black crappie, and largemouth bass in above average numbers. Northern pike and yellow bullhead were also captured, fish that thrive in clearer waters. Eurasian watermilfoil has been confirmed by the DNR in Schutz Lake since 1990. No comprehensive vegetation survey data is available

Wetlands

The 2003 MCWD Functional Assessment of Wetlands (FAW) evaluated wetlands within the subwatershed. Only a few of those wetlands exhibited any high habitat or aesthetic values (see Figure 13). The wetlands riparian to Schutz Lake were found to have high fish habitat values.

2.4 Human Environment

2.4.1 Present Land Use

The principal land uses in the northern part of the subwatershed are single family residential and park and open space (see Figure 7).  South of Highway 5 the subwatershed is mainly agriculture and vacant/undeveloped area with some single family and the campus of Southwest Metro Catholic High School.

Table 1.  Percent of Schutz Lake subwatershed by 2000 land use.

Land Use 2000

Acres

% of Subwatershed

Vacant

267.3

27.6

Agriculture

222.4

22.9

Park and Open Space*

173.1

17.9

Single Family Residential

136.6

14.1

Water

109.8

11.3

Institutional

48.5

5.0

Highway

11.6

1.2

Industrial

0.03

<0.1

 

969.33

 

Source: Metropolitan Council.  See Figure 7.

2.4.2 2020 and 2030 Land Use Planning

Future land use north of Highway 5 is not expected to change dramatically by 2020 or 2030 (see Figure 8 and Figure 9), although there will be development. It is expected that the remaining agricultural and undeveloped lands in the southern area that are not part of the Landscape Arboretum and Horticultural Research Center would be developed as higher density residential along Highway 5 and low density residential elsewhere.

The 2030 land use is not expected to vary significantly from the 2020 planned land use. The Metropolitan Council 2030 Planning Framework classifies the entire subwatershed as a developing area.

2.4.3 Aquatic Recreation

There are no public beaches or accesses to the lake. The Carver Park Reserve abuts the northwesterly portion of the lake. A park trail loops through the area but does not access the lake. The Southwest Hennepin LRT Regional Trail crosses the subwatershed.

2.5 Hydrologic Systems

The Department of Natural Resources? Public Waters Inventory identifies three basins within the Schutz Lake subwatershed as under the jurisdiction of the DNR (see Figure 10). 

Table 2.  Public Waters in the Schutz Lake subwatershed.

DNR ID #

Name

10-18P

Schutz Lake

10-195W

Unnamed

10-196W

Unnamed

Source: Minnesota DNR. See Figure 10.

The 2003 MCWD Hydrologic, Hydraulic, and Pollutant Loading Study (HHPLS) included detailed modeling of the current and 2020 hydraulic and hydrologic conditions in the subwatershed.  That modeling includes the following results for 7 modeled nodes within the subwatershed:

  • Existing Normal Water Level;
  • Existing High Water Level, peak discharge, and peak velocity for the 1.5 year, 24-hour and 100-year, 24-hour events;
  • 2020 predicted HWL, peak discharge, and peak velocity for the 100-year, 24-hour event; and the
  • Existing High Water Level for the 100-year, 10-day snowmelt event.

Those detailed results are not reproduced here, but are incorporated by reference.  The HHPLS model predicted that development in the upper subwatershed expected by 2020 would likely have minimal impacts on peak rate and volume, but that runoff rates and volumes from development should be monitored to prevent excessive flows in the small stream that drains the upper subwatershed.  

Table 3.  Modeled peak discharge from the Schultz Lake subwatershed (cfs).

Event

Existing

2020

Snowmelt

1.5 year, 24 hour

28.3

-

-

100 year, 24 hour

42.3

43.2

-

100-year, 10-day

-

-

49.0

Source:  2003 MCWD Hydrologic, Hydraulic, and Pollutant Loading Study (HHPLS)

2.5.1 Lakes

Schutz Lake is the primary receiving water within the subwatershed, and is classified by the DNR as a Recreational Development lake. It has a surface area of 105 acres, and a maximum depth of 49 feet. Schutz Lake has been monitored by the District only for a few years, but has been monitored for Secchi depth since 1981 and as part of the Metropolitan Council's Citizen Assisted Monitoring Program (CAMP) since 2000. Between 2002 and 2004 it has scored in the B-C grade range on the District's annual lake report cards. In 2004 the mean summer phosphorus concentration was 49 ?g/L, greater than the 40 ?g/L goal established in the HHPLS. Water clarity as measured by Secchi disk was 1.3 meters and the Trophic State Index was 60. The CAMP volunteer recorded the physical condition of the lake as ranging from 'some algae present? to ?definite algae present,? but also recorded its recreational suitability as ?beautiful.? According to standards established by the MPCA, water quality in Schutz Lake only partially supports swimming.

Table 4. Selected water quality goals and current conditions of lakes in the Schutz Lake subwatershed.

Lake1997 TP Goal (?g/L)HHPLS TP Goal (?g/L)2002-2004 Average TP (?g/L)2004
TP (?g/L)Chl-a (?g/L)Secchi (m)TSI
Schutz50403649261.360

Source: MCWD

2.5.2 Streams

There is a small stream that conveys discharge through the central portion of the watershed north to Highway 5. No monitoring data is available for this channel.

2.5.3 Ditches

There are no public drainage ditches established under Minnesota Statutes Chapter 103E within this subwatershed.

2.5.4 Wetlands

Approximately 18 percent of the land area within the Schutz Lake subwatershed is shown on the National Wetland Inventory as wetland (see Table 5).

Table 5.  National Wetlands Inventory wetlands in the Schutz Lake subwatershed.

Circular 39 TypeArea (acres)Cowardin ClassArea (acres)
Seasonal2.3Emergent59.4
Shallow Marsh57.0Forested0.9
Deep Marsh5.0Unconsolidated Bottom109.7
Open Water104.7  
Forested0.9  
Total169.9 169.9

Source: Minnesota DNR

In 2001-2003 the District undertook a Functional Assessment of Wetlands (FAW) on all wetlands greater than one-quarter acre in size. This assessment used a variant of the Minnesota Routine Assessment Method. In contrast to Table 5 above, which shows wetland acreage and type from the National Wetlands Inventory completed in the 1980s, Table 6 below shows the acreage and type as assessed in the field. Using the results of that analysis, individual wetlands were assigned to one of four categories – Preserve, and Manage 1, 2, or 3 (see Figure 12 and Table 7). Wetlands that were evaluated as Exceptional or High on certain ecological or hydrologic values were assigned to the Preserve category. The balance of evaluated wetlands were assigned to a category based on this assessment of current functions and values, with Manage 1 wetlands exhibiting higher values and Manage 2 and 3 moderate or lower values. Refer to the Functional Assessment of Wetlands (2003) for details of methodology, classification, and management recommendations.

Table 6.  Dominant wetland type in the Schutz Lake subwatershed as assessed in the Funtional Assessment of Wetlands.

Circular 39 TypeArea (acres)
Seasonal5.1
Wet Meadow54.8
Shallow Marsh14.4
Deep Marsh36.4
Open Water3.2
Scrub Shrub0.3
Forested13.9
Lakes106.0
Not Typed4.3
Total238.4

Note: The FAW excluded large lakes and wetlands less than 1/4 acre in size; those areas are included in the NWI, so total will not match Tables 5 or 6.

Source: Minnesota DNR.  See Figure 12.

The Preserve wetlands within the Schutz Lake subwatershed were classified as such because of their landscape location and their ability to provide downstream water quality protection (see Figure 12).

There are numerous wetlands in the subwatershed that the FAW identified as being of high or moderate restoration potential (see Figure 14). Several wetlands along the central drainage corridor were identified as high restoration potential, along with some wetlands on Arboretum property.

2.5.5 Floodplain

All the cities with land in this subwatershed participate in the National Flood Program and have completed Flood Insurance Studies. Figure 15 indicates that no 100-year or 500-year floodplain has been delineated within this subwatershed.

2.5.6 Groundwater

The HHPLS identified the infiltration potential of the upland areas within the subwatershed as generally medium, with the areas of loamy clay soils classified as low potential. Because of the organic nature of the soils in the wetland areas, in general infiltration potential there is variable (see Figure 16). The Carver County Water Resource Management Plan classifies the groundwater resources of most of the western subwatershed area as being of medium to low sensitivity to pollution, and the major wetland areas on the north and in the south as being highly sensitive (see Figure 17).

A City of Victoria public well is located just inside the border of the Schutz Lake subwatershed, but the Minnesota Department of Health has not yet designated a Drinking Water Sensitivity Management Area for it. The County Well Index has records of about 50 active private, shallow wells within the subwatershed.

3.0 Problems and Issues

3.1 Water Quality

  1. The water quality in Schutz Lake since 1998 has consistently been scored in the B grade range on the District's annual lake report cards.  The HHPLS modeled an in-lake total phosphorus concentration of 43, nearly achieving the desired goal of 40 ?g/L. 
  2. Development, redevelopment, and reconstruction in the subwatershed is predicted to increase nutrient and TSS loads from the watershed as well as increased volume of stormwater runoff.

3.2 Water Quantity

  1. Drainage is conveyed through the subwatershed through a series of culverts and channels that should be evaluated, monitored, and replaced or repaired as necessary to maintain conveyance, minimize erosion, minimize hydrologic bounce, and maintain adequate water levels in lakes and wetlands.  The HHPLS and Regional Team input identified one in particular that exhibited some need for maintenance: the culvert that serves as the outlet from the wetland north of Schutz Lake under Highway 7.
  2. Development, redevelopment, and reconstruction in the subwatershed is predicted to increase volume of runoff as well as increase nutrient and TSS loads from the watershed, potentially further degrading water quality in lakes, streams, and wetlands.
  3. Future development in the southern subwatershed could increase volume and velocity of discharge conveyed by the channel that drains the central part of the watershed, and could create erosion and sediment transport issues.
  4. The HHPLS predicted that the outlet of the wetland north of the lake would overtop during 100 year or larger events.  Local plans should identify these observed or potential locations and assess whether the risk of occasional flooding is acceptable or should be addressed.

3.3 Wetlands

  1. As described in Section 2.5.4, the subwatershed includes some large, Preserve classification wetlands that provide a high level of water quality protection to downstream waterbodies.   Those functions should be protected.
  2. Several wetlands with moderate restoration potential in the central drainage area of the subwatershed should be evaluated for improvement to provide ecological value and water quality treatment as the southern subwatershed further develops.

3.4 Ecological Integrity

  1. Wetland and associated upland areas with high ecological value are present and should be conserved and connected to provide wildlife corridors.  Figure 19 identifies an ecological corridor through the central subwatershed which should be preserved through District efforts as well as local planning.
  2. The Schutz Lake fishery has not been surveyed since 1991.  That survey should be updated to better evaluate the fishery and how it is impacted by water quality.
  3. No detailed information is available on aquatic vegetation in Schutz Lake.

3.5 Groundwater

  1. The FAW concluded that most of the larger wetlands in the subwatershed were discharge or combination discharge/recharge.  Increased infiltration in the southern subwatershed may be required to help preserve that hydrology as that area develops.
  2. As described in Section 2.5.6 and Figure 17, there is a high aquifer sensitivity area in the northern watershed where any stormwater should be pretreated prior to discharge. 
  3. A Wellhead Protection Area and associated Drinking Water Supply Management Area (not yet designated) for a City of Victoria well in the vicinity may be partly located within this subwatershed in the future.  If their delineation includes part of this subwatershed, stormwater management within those areas should be coordinated with wellhead protection plans.   

3.6 Impacts of Future Growth

Water Quantity and Quality

Land use change impacts downstream water quality by increasing the volume of runoff and the concentration and load of nutrients and sediment transported to receiving waters.  Table 8 illustrates how land use change such as the expected conversion of agricultural and vacant land to low- and medium-density residential could be expected to impact water quality in Schutz Lake.  The table also illustrates the impact of a regulatory program managing these impacts.

Ultimate development in this case is defined as the conversion of all agricultural lands and one-half of the upland forested area outside the regional park that remains undeveloped in the 2020 local government land use plans.  This conversion may take place by 2030 or require significantly more time; but it is assumed that at some point in the future these conversions will occur.  More detail regarding this modeling can be found in Technical Appendix A.

Table 8 contrasts three loading reduction scenarios.  Scenarios 1 and 2 contrast the expected results if there were no regulatory program to the results under the existing regulatory program.  The HHPLS assumed that there would be no load increase from future development; the third scenario indicates that even with a regulatory program that strictly prohibits any new phosphorus loading, additional reductions would be necessary to achieve the desired phosphorus concentration goal of 40 ?g/L.

 2020Ultimate Development
Scenario 1:  No Regulatory Program
Predicted in-lake TP (?g/L) 52 
P load decrease needed to achieve 40 ?g/L (lbs/year) 124
Scenario 2: Current Regulatory Program
Predicted in-lake TP (?g/L)4847
P load decrease needed to achieve 40 ?g/L (lbs/year) 70

Scenario 3: Regulatory Program That Prohibits A Net Increase in Loading from New Development (As assumed in HHPLS)

Predicted in-lake TP (?g/L) 42
Additional P load decrease needed to achieve 40 ?g/L (lbs/year) 17

Other Impacts

While most of the upper Schutz Lake subwatershed outside the Carver Park Reserve has been impacted by development, the southern, upper subwatershed is yet only moderately developed.  The area outside the park reserve faces varying threat levels from degradation as a result of development pressure, urbanization, and subsequent channelization of stream conveyances.  Those impacts could exacerbate impacts already affecting natural resource integrity in the downstream, developed part of the subwatershed.  Prior to the encroachment of additional development, the opportunity exists to create a connection between the upper and lower subwatershed to improve water quality, preserve natural conveyances, and facilitate the movement and proliferation of native species as well as enhance recreational opportunities.

The opportunity exists to conserve approximately 4700 feet of channel and 105 acres of adjoining wetland complexes and adjacent high priority uplands. This will improve the characteristics of the aquatic ecosystem and the water quality within the subwatershed as well as areas downstream.  Key Conservation Areas and the corridor plan for this subwatershed are illustrated on Figure 19 of this document.

4.0 Resource Management Goals and Strategies

The following section presents the 17 watershed goals approved by the MCWD, measurable objectives, metrics and the specific goals and actions for the Schutz Lake subwatershed.

4.1 Abstraction/Filtration

Goal 1 - Abstraction/Filtration

Promote abstraction of surface water where feasible for the purposes of improving water quality and increasing groundwater recharge throughout the watershed.

Discussion

Development and the associated creation of new impervious surface increase the volume of stormwater runoff.  The new runoff volume can convey more pollutants to receiving waters and may increase erosion and sediment transport, negatively affecting water quality.  Development also decreases the amount of stormwater that naturally percolates into the soil to recharge groundwater, thus reducing baseflow in streams, changing hydrology in groundwater-fed wetlands, and decreasing water availability in drinking water aquifers.

Abstraction of stormwater (retained on site through infiltration, evapotranspiration, or capture and reuse) reduces the amount of runoff from the site conveying pollutants. The most common type of abstraction, infiltration, reduces runoff, which helps recharge groundwater. Filtration offers an opportunity to use soil to naturally cleanse stormwater prior to discharge.  Increased abstraction and filtration in the Schutz Lake subwatershed is desirable for two primary reasons: 1) to reduce the amount of pollutant loading into Schutz Lake, and 2) to protect the hydrology of the discharge (groundwater-fed) wetlands in the south central subwatershed.   Many of those wetlands are key resources with high ecological values that are dependant on groundwater to maintain those functions and values.

A key strategy to achieve this goal is the adoption of a volume management standard for new development and redevelopment that requires the abstraction of one inch of rainfall.   Much of the subwatershed has at least moderate infiltration potential.  Requiring new development and redevelopment to abstract some of the new stormwater generated would:

Minimize additional pollutant loading that would have been conveyed by that stormwater.  Abstraction and infiltration are important tools in achieving the load reductions necessary to achieve water quality goals in Schutz Lake, and to prevent further degradation of the other lakes, streams, and wetlands;

Reduce runoff volumes and help reduce future downstream erosion in streams and channels or flooding in landlocked basins; and

Help maintain groundwater levels, preserving wetland hydrology and stream baseflows. 

Desired Outcomes:  Increased infiltration, reduction in pollutant loading and volumes of runoff to supplement other goals.

Metrics:  Acre-feet of infiltration to meet nutrient loading reductions for water quality and volume reductions for water quantity goals.

Goal 1.1 - Schutz Lake

Increase abstraction and infiltration to reduce runoff volumes carrying pollutant loads to Schutz Lake and to promote groundwater recharge.

Actions

  1. In consultation with LGUs through an appropriate rulemaking process, amend existing or establish new District rules to increase stormwater requirements through consideration of abstraction of the first one inch of rainfall on new permitted development and redevelopment.
  2. Construct regional infiltration basins on a cooperative basis with LGUs where additional infiltration is desired.
  3. Promote reforestation and revegetation with native plants to increase infiltration.
  4. Develop infiltration strategies appropriate to potential future wellhead protection areas and areas of groundwater sensitivity.
  5. Provide technical assistance to LGUs and developers to foster low impact development and redevelopment that minimizes new impervious surface and provides for increased infiltration.
    1. Develop and distribute model ordinances and design standards that incorporate low impact design principles.
    2. Sponsor educational opportunities for LGU staff, developers, elected and appointed officials and other interested parties to provide practical information and opportunities for sharing experiences.
    3. Provide education and training opportunities, technical and planning assistance for property owners and LGUs on methods to reduce runoff from and increase infiltration on their property by incorporating BMPs into landscaping, infrastructure maintenance, and reconstruction.
    4. Develop a small grant program to provide financial assistance to property owners desiring to retrofit their property with BMPs to increase infiltration.

4.2 Ecological Integrity

Goal 2 - Ecological Integrity

Promote activities that maintain, support and enhance floral, faunal quantity and ecological integrity of upland and aquatic resources throughout the watershed.

Discussion

The Schutz Lake subwatershed has two areas identified for ecological conservation. The first is the riparian wetlands and regional park uplands adjacent to Schutz Lake. The second is the central wetlands area that is drained by a small channel that could form the backbone of a wildlife corridor. Most of area identified for future development has been disturbed by agriculture, but preservation of undisturbed areas in new developments may be possible to minimize new runoff volumes.

Connected corridors are desirable as they provide a variety of habitats both aquatic and terrestrial as well as protected areas for passage. Within these conservation areas wherever possible the District would promote the conservation or establishment of native vegetation to increase or maintain infiltration rates; decrease or maintain runoff rates and pollutant conveyance to water resources; and minimize erosion of shorelines and streambanks. Sustaining or improving water quality and ecological integrity is necessary to meet the District goals in this plan as well as to meet state and federal nondegradation and water quality requirements and to prevent the need for future TMDLs.

The Schutz Lake subwatershed includes several wetlands with exceptional or high fish or wildlife habitat value as well as wetlands with exceptional or high vegetative diversity. The Key Conservation Areas identified in this plan include those wetlands as well as associated upland areas of high ecological value such as maple-basswood forest. Conservation of those associated upland areas not only provides additional habitat type, but also helps preserve local runoff and infiltration rates.

Schutz Lake itself is a primary ecological resource. There is little information on aquatic vegetation communities in Schutz Lake. The primary strategies for improving aquatic communities are the acquisition of new data such as vegetation surveys and management plans, and improvement and maintenance of water quality.

Desired Outcomes: Functional and healthy ecological corridors and waters throughout the subwatershed.

Metrics:

  • Acres of land conserved in Key Conservation Areas
  • Acres of restored/created wetland within Key Conservation Areas
  • Acres of land conserved in Key Conservation Areas
  • Linear feet and width of riparian areas protected in Key Conservation Areas

Goal 2.1 - Schutz Lake

Maintain and improve overall ecological integrity within the subwatershed.

Actions

  1. Protect existing fish and wildlife habitat and promote the improvement of habitat and corridors by the conservation and restoration of key ecological areas (see Figure 19).
    1. Require LGUs to recognize key ecological areas in their natural resources and land use planning and to identify in their Local Water Management plans how they intend to conserve their ecological values.
    2. Provide education and training opportunities, technical and planning assistance, and financial incentives to LGUs to actively conserve key ecological areas.
    3. Restore areas of degradation within key areas.
    4. Work cooperatively with other agencies and organizations to improve upon existing conservation corridors and where practical, develop new conservation corridors that connect the wetlands within the southern Schutz Lake subwatershed with Schutz Lake and its adjacent high-value conservation areas.
  2. Identify keystone, umbrella, and indicator species to serve as indicators of ecological integrity, evaluate existing habitat within the subwatershed, and develop strategies for the conservation of that habitat.
  3. Provide regulatory incentives for the conservation of undisturbed native vegetation as sites develop.
  4. Require MCWD review of and comment on preliminary plats and vegetation surveys.

Goal 2.2 - Schutz Lake

Maintain conditions suitable for a healthy and varied fish community within Schutz Lake.

Actions

  1. Work cooperatively with the DNR in fishery management efforts, and request that fish surveys be conducted regularly.
  2. Achieve Schutz Lake water quality and clarity goals to maintain or improve habitat conditions.
  3. Manage aquatic vegetation in accordance with a vegetation management plan that takes into account fishery habitat requirements.

Goal 2.3 - Schutz Lake

Maintain a healthy aquatic vegetation community.

Actions

  1. Perform a baseline survey of aquatic vegetation in Schutz Lake and update that survey every five years.
  2. Develop and implement an aquatic vegetation management plan for Schutz Lake that evaluates options for the management of internal phosphorus loads as well as maintenance of a desirable aquatic vegetation community.
  3. Recruit and train volunteers to monitor aquatic vegetation in Schutz Lake on an ongoing basis.

4.3 Water Quality

Goal 3 - Water Quality

Preserve, maintain and improve aesthetic, physical, chemical and biological composition of surface waters and groundwater within the District.

Discussion

The HHPLS used an extensive public input process to establish water quality goals for the primary receiving waters in the District, focusing primarily on identifying target total phosphorus concentrations. This plan identifies those plus additional goals related to water quality. This plan sets forth a set of actions the District will undertake to reduce pollutant loading in the subwatershed and achieve water quality goals. The achievement of these water quality goals is not only necessary to meet state and federal water quality requirements and to prevent future TMDLs, but also to meet this plan's ecological integrity goals.

Desired Outcomes: Achievement of in-lake nutrient concentration goals through achievement of nutrient loading reductions.

Metrics: In-lake nutrient concentrations/Trophic State Index Scores (TSI) for Schutz Lake Nutrient loading goals (lbs) for Schutz Lake.

Goal 3.1 - Schutz Lake

Achieve in-lake total phosphorus concentration goal of 40 ?g/L in Schutz Lake.

Actions

  1. Construct a detention pond at the outlet of subwatershed unit SL-2 (see Figure 20) to reduce phosphorus loading from the upper subwatershed by at least 50 percent.
  2. Require LGUs to reduce phosphorus loading from developed and agricultural uses by a minimum of 14 pounds per year within 10 years.i. Provide education and training opportunities, technical and planning assistance for property owners and LGUs on methods to reduce phosphorus and sediment loading by incorporating BMPs into landscaping, agricultural practices, infrastructure maintenance, and reconstruction.
  3. Provide assistance to LGUs and developers to foster low impact development and redevelopment that minimizes new phosphorus and sediment loading.
    1. Develop and distribute model ordinances and design standards that incorporate low impact design principles.
    2. Sponsor educational opportunities for LGU staff, developers, elected and appointed officials and other interested parties to provide practical information and opportunities for sharing experiences.
  4. Promote the general application of BMPs across the subwatershed.
    1. Consider developing a small grant program to provide financial assistance to property owners desiring to retrofit their property with BMPs to reduce phosphorus and sediment loading.
  5. Continue regular water quality monitoring in Schutz Lake to assess progress toward achieving the in-lake phosphorus goal.

Goal 3.2 - Schutz Lake

Achieve and maintain other state lake water quality standards in Schutz Lake including >1.4 m Secchi clarity and 14 ug/L chl-a,

Actions

  1. Achieve and maintain in-lake total phosphorus goals.
  2. Manage aquatic vegetation in accordance with a vegetation management plan that takes into account water clarity goals.
  3. Develop a water quality index which encompasses the District's broader definition of water quality.

Goal 3.3 - Schutz Lake

Minimize pollutant loading contribution to Smithtown Bay from Schutz Lake.

Actions

  1. Achieve Schutz Lake in-lake total phosphorus concentration goal.

4.4 Public Health

Goal 4 - Public Health

Minimize the risks of threats to public health through the development of programs, plans and policies that improve the quality of surface and groundwater resources.

Discussion

There are some potential threats to public health in the Schutz Lake subwatershed. A portion of the subwatershed is outside the Municipal Urban Services Area (MUSA), and property owners use individual sewage treatment systems for their sanitary service. Agricultural land uses generate and use animal waste that if improperly managed could be a source of pathogens. Where sewer service is available, sewage overflows from breaks or improperly functioning infrastructure could result in overflows discharged to downstream water resources. An additional potential source of pathogens is waterfowl, which are attracted to open water with easy routes from the water to vegetation on shore. The District's role in minimizing the threats to public health in the Schutz Lake subwatershed is mainly to provide targeted information to landowners and LGUs.

Desired Outcomes: Minimization of threats to public health from contact with contaminated surface waters.

Metrics: Reported cases of illness transmission via surface water contact.

Goal 4.1 - Schutz Lake

Minimize risks to human health and water quality from land use activities.

Actions

  1. Develop and implement a plan to systematically identify animal waste management and individual sewage treatment system locations in the subwatershed and assess the risks to human health and water quality.
  2. Work cooperatively with the state, University of Minnesota extension Service, Carver County and LGUs to provide animal waste management information and technical assistance to landowners engaged in plant and animal agriculture or husbandry.
  3. Work cooperatively with the state, Carver County and LGUs to provide BMP information and technical assistance to individual sewage treatment system owners.

Goal 4.2 - Schutz Lake

Maintain a vegetated shoreline on Schutz Lake where practical and effective to reduce overpopulation of the lake with waterfowl.

Actions

  1. Conduct a shoreline vegetation survey to identify current shoreline status and to identify locations where restoration may be desirable and feasible.
  2. Promote native vegetation over structural shoreline stabilization where appropriate in District policies, regulations, and programs.
  3. Work cooperatively with LGUs and property owners to restore native shoreline vegetation where appropriate.
    1. Provide education and training opportunities, technical and planning assistance, and demonstration project funding to LGUs to assist them in restoring shorelines and buffers on public property such as parks and open spaces, taking into consideration the balance between recreational use and ecosystem needs.
    2. Develop and distribute written material to shoreline property owners explaining the benefits of shoreline restoration and buffer creation to waterfowl control and providing design, plant selection, installation, and maintenance advice.

Goal 4.3 - Schutz Lake

Require LGUs and other agencies to manage public sanitary sewer infrastructure to minimize sewage overflows and to minimize impacts from those overflows on District water resources.

4.5 Water Quantity

Goal 5 - Water Quantity

Maintain or reduce existing flows from drainage within the watershed to decrease the negative effects of stormwater runoff and bounce from existing and proposed development as well as provide low flow augmentation to surface waters.

Discussion

Development and the associated creation of new impervious surface increases the volume of stormwater runoff from the landscape, changes the rates and times to peak runoff flow, and decreases the amount of stormwater that naturally percolates into the soil to recharge groundwater. The District's long term goal in the Schutz Lake subwatershed is to achieve no increase in the volume of stormwater discharged from the subwatershed into Lake Minnetonka. Implementation strategies will include minimizing new runoff volumes from development, and encouraging infiltration and groundwater recharge.

A key strategy to achieve this goal is the adoption of a volume management standard for new development and redevelopment that requires the abstraction (removal from runoff through infiltration, capture and reuse, evapotranspiration, etc.) of one inch of rainfall. Approximately 70 percent of annual runoff volume in Minnesota results from precipitation events of 1? or less (MPCA, 2000). Requiring new development and redevelopment to abstract (retain on site through infiltration, evapotranspiration, or capture and reuse) runoff from small rain event would significantly reduce new volumes of runoff flowing downstream and help reduce future erosion in streams and channels; minimize new pollutant loading that would have been conveyed by that stormwater; and help maintain groundwater levels, preserving wetlands. The additional new volume could be mitigated through construction of regional infiltration basins, restoring drained wetlands, reforestation and revegetation, or other means.

Table 9.  Modeled annual volume of runoff in the Schutz Lake subwatershed, and estimated reductions resulting from application of a proposed 1" abstraction rule for new development and redevelopment (acre-feet)

2000 modeled annual subwatershed runoff volume207
2020 modeled annual subwatershed runoff volume244
Ultimate Development modeled annual subwatershed runoff volume274
Increase between 2000 and Ultimate development67
Estimated volume abstracted by 1" rule47
New volume to be abstracted through other means such as capital projects, wetland restorations, reforestation and revegetation, etc.20

Desired Outcomes: Management of new annual water volume discharged from the subwatershed.

Metrics: Acre-feet volume abstraction.

Goal 5.1 - Schutz Lake

Reduce volume of stormwater runoff from new development and redevelopment and maintain or reduce existing water volumes discharged from the subwatershed.

Actions

  1. Amend existing or establish new District rules requiring abstraction of the first one inch of rainfall on new permitted development and redevelopment.
  2. Track volumes abstracted and new volumes created resulting from permitted development.
  3. Provide assistance to LGUs and developers to foster low impact development and redevelopment that minimizes new stormwater volumes.
    1. Develop and distribute model ordinances and design standards that incorporate low impact design principles.
    2. Sponsor educational opportunities for LGU staff, developers, elected and appointed officials and other interested parties to provide practical information and opportunities for sharing experiences.
  4. Encourage the development and maintenance of depressional storage within the subwatershed.

Goal 5.2 - Schutz Lake

Manage water volumes conveyed by the channel draining the upper subwatershed to prevent further erosion.

Actions

  1. Inspect that channel at least annually to assess its condition.
  2. Work cooperatively with the City of Victoria to manage flows in the channel to reduce volumes as necessary.

Goal 5.3 - Schutz Lake

Require public stormwater conveyance and control structures in the subwatershed to be sized and maintained properly to convey current and ultimate stormwater flows to minimize erosion and flooding potential.

Actions

  1. The HHPLS noted that the culvert that serves as the outlet to the wetland on the north end of Schutz Lake was in poor condition, as was an eroded adjacent channel. Local plans should identify these locations and set forth a plan for repair or improvement. Assist LGUS in determining specific impacts and potential improvements.
  2. Require LGUs to provide to the District a copy of their annual NPDES report.

4.6 Shorelines and Streambanks

Goal 6 - Shorelines and Streambanks

Preserve the natural appearance of shoreline areas and minimize degradation of surface water quality which can result from dredging operations.

Discussion

Eroding shorelines and streambanks contribute to the degradation of water quality.  Native vegetation can effectively stabilize these areas, filter runoff for sediment and other pollutants, and provide habitat.  Restoration of shoreline and maintenance of existing natural shoreline on Schutz Lake and wetlands within the subwatershed is a key strategy for meeting this plan's goals.

Much of Schutz Lake's lakeshore is undeveloped or is minimally disturbed.  Maintaining that native vegetation would help increase or maintain infiltration rates; decrease or maintain runoff rates and pollutant conveyance to water resources; help create fish and wildlife habitat; and help minimize erosion.  Sustaining or improving water quality and ecological integrity is necessary to meet District goals as well as to meet state and federal nondegradation and water quality requirements and to prevent the need for future TMDLs. 

Desired Outcomes:  Stable streambanks and shorelines to supplement other goals.

Metrics:

  • Linear feet of stabilized eroded shoreline and streambank
  • Linear feet of shoreline protected in Key Conservation areas

Goal 6.1 - Schutz Lake

Promote shoreline restoration and shoreline buffer creation as methods to help meet pollutant loading reduction and ecological integrity goals.

Actions

  1. Conduct a shoreline vegetation survey to identify current shoreline status and to identify locations where restoration may be desirable and feasible.
  2. Promote native vegetation over structural shoreline stabilization in District policies, regulations, and programs.
    1. Provide education and training opportunities, technical and planning assistance, and demonstration project funding to LGUs to assist them in restoring shorelines and buffers on public property such as parks and open spaces.
    2. Develop and distribute written material to shoreline property owners explaining the benefits of shoreline restoration and buffer creation to the reduction of pollutant loads and creation of shoreline habitat and providing design, plant selection, installation, and maintenance advice.
    3. Develop a small grant program to provide financial assistance to property owners desiring to restore their shoreline or plant a buffer.

4.7 Navigation

Goal 7 - Navigation

Maintain the hydraulic capacity of and minimize obstruction to navigation without compromising wildlife habitat in watercourses and preserve water quality and navigation appearance in shoreland areas.

Discussion

The District recognizes the riparian rights of property owners to have and maintain access to public waters.  The District will not participate in the removal of nuisance aquatic vegetation solely for the purpose of improving navigation, but may consider macrophyte control where excessive growth contributes to poor water quality.

Desired Outcomes:  Minimization of impacts on water resources from dredging.

Metrics:  Compliance with the dredging policy.

Goal 7.1 - Schutz Lake

Manage dredging activities so as to preserve the natural appearance of shoreline areas; recreational, wildlife and fisheries resources of surface waters; surface water quality and ecological integrity of the riparian environment.

Actions

  1. Regulate dredging activities in a manner consistent with local policy and Minnesota Rules Chapter 6115.0200

4.8 Best Management Practices

Goal 8 - Best Management Practices

Improve water quality by promoting best management practices (BMP's), requiring their adoption in local plans and their implementation on development sites.

Discussion

This plan and District regulations stipulate the use of Best Management Practices (BMPs) to reduce stormwater volumes and pollutant loadings, but do not prescribe which practices should be used. This allows the LGU and developers the flexibility to implement those that are most appropriate for local conditions and opportunities. A key strategy for plan implementation is providing early consultation with and technical assistance to and education of stakeholders including city staff, residents, and developers to increase knowledge and acceptance of various BMPs and to promote their adoption.

Desired Outcomes: Implementation of Best Management Practices on private and public property to supplement other goals.

Metrics: Compliance with the early consultation requirement.

Goal 8.1 - Schutz Lake

Promote best management practices as methods to help meet pollutant loading and volume reduction goals established in this subwatershed plan.

Actions

  1. Require LGUs to identify in their local water management plans how they plan to meet specific phosphorus loading minimum reduction goals and stormwater volumes from developed and agricultural uses through the implementation of BMPs in the subwatershed.
    1. Provide education and training opportunities, technical and planning assistance for LGUs on methods to reduce phosphorus and sediment loading by incorporating BMPs into landscaping, infrastructure maintenance, and reconstruction.
  2. To promote BMPs and encourage early consultation by developers, amend District rules to incorporate a requirement for stormwater management plan approval prior to submittal of a preliminary plat.
  3. Develop and distribute model ordinances and design standards that illustrate the proper application of various BMPs.

4.9 Education and Communications

Goal 9 - Education and Communications

Enhance public participation and knowledge regarding District activities and provide informational and educational material to municipalities, community groups, businesses, schools, developers, contractors and individuals.

Discussion

The District conducts an active and strategic education and communication program watershed-wide to provide general information and to various stakeholder groups in accordance with its five-year strategic education and outreach plan. Targeted information will be necessary in the Schutz Lake subwatershed to educate these stakeholders as to the District's specific goals for this subwatershed, the actions the District plans to take, and their role in conserving water resources in the subwatershed. The specific targeted messages will emphasize stewardship activities that will help maintain the water quality and vegetated shoreline of Schutz Lake.

Desired Outcomes: Stewardship over water resources by residents of the subwatershed to assist District activities and supplement other goals.

Metrics: Telephone survey.

Goal 9.1 - Schutz Lake

Provide focused education and outreach opportunities within this subwatershed to supplement the general education and outreach program and assist in the achievement of these subwatershed goals.

Actions

  1. Develop and distribute targeted written material to stakeholder groups (e.g., residents, shoreline property owners, developers) explaining the need maintain water quality and the vegetated shoreline of Schutz Lake and providing strategies that each stakeholder group can employ to assist in meeting this goal.
  2. Sponsor educational opportunities for LGU staff, developers, elected and appointed officials and other interested parties to provide practical information and opportunities for sharing experiences.
  3. Prepare and distribute timely news releases to coincide with education efforts to inform the public of BMPs and other District actions that affect them directly.

Goal 9.2 - Schutz Lake

Provide participation and outreach activities to increase awareness of water and other natural resources within the subwatershed.

Actions

  1. Promote the development of a Schutz Lake Association.
  2. Recruit and train volunteers to monitor aquatic vegetation in Schutz Lake on an ongoing basis.

Goal 9.3 - Schutz Lake

Work cooperatively with other agencies and groups to coordinate education and outreach efforts to avoid duplication of efforts and maximize resources.

4.10 Ditches

Goal 10 - Public Ditches

Maintain public ditch systems within the District as required under Statutory jurisdiction.

There are no Public Ditch goals and actions specific to the Schutz Lake subwatershed.

4.11 Wetlands

Goal 11 - Wetlands

Preserve, create and restore wetland resources and maximize the benefits and functionality of wetlands to the watershed.

Discussion

The Functional Assessment of Wetlands evaluated 137.5 acres of wetland within this subwatershed, of which 54.5 acres fell into the Preserve category.  There are several wetlands of exceptional and high quality functions and values within this subwatershed.  Their conservation is integral to achieving ecological integrity goals, as well as water quality, stormwater management, and floodplain management goals.

A key strategy of this plan is regulation of wetland impacts in accordance with a management classification based on the functions and values findings of the Functional Assessment of Wetlands.  Wetlands are assigned to a classification – either Preserve or Manage 1, 2, or 3 – and allowable impacts would be based on that classification.  The wetlands with the highest values – those in the Preserve classification – would be allowed minimal impacts.  The Manage classifications would be allowed some impacts, such as accepting new stormwater discharges, depending on classification.   This strategy would preserve existing high values such as habitat, vegetative diversity, and sensitivity, while also recognizing that wetlands play an important part in managing stormwater.  Wetlands provide essential storm and flood water storage.

Wetlands of exceptional or high vegetative diversity or fish or wildlife habitat value have been designated key conservation areas, as have wetlands that are riparian to streams or channels, have high restoration potential, provide key floodplain storage, or are located in important natural resources conservation areas such as regional park reserves or wildlife corridors.

Except for those in the Preserve classification, which would be managed to an even higher standard, these conservation wetlands would be managed as if they were Manage 1 classification wetlands, with limitations on the amount of new runoff that can be directed to them, and a requirement to pretreat any new discharges to them.

An important part of achieving the goal of no net loss of wetland size, quality, and type will be tracking those impacts to assist in identifying future restoration or wetland creation needs. 

Equally important to the regulation of wetlands is the restoration of degraded wetlands within the subwatershed.  Figure 14 identifies wetlands based on restoration potential.  Restoring wetlands increases specific functions and values of the resource within the watershed ranging from management of flows to water quality improvement to enhancement of the overall ecosystem, particularly within identified corridors.

Desired Outcomes:  Maintain existing quantity and quality of wetlands throughout subwatershed; improve wetland and surface water quality within Key Conservation Areas.

Metrics: 

  • Wetland quantity (acres)
  • Wetland quality (acres/management classification)
  • Acres of restored/created wetland within Key Conservation Areas

Goal 11.1 - Schutz Lake

Maintain existing acreage of wetlands within the subwatershed and achieve no net loss in their size, quality, type and biological diversity.

Actions

  1. Regulate wetland impacts commensurate with the quality of the wetland as determined by the Management Classifications identified in the Functional Assessment of Wetlands (FAW).
  2. In consultation with LGUs through an appropriate rulemaking process, amend existing or establish new District rules requiring submittal of a functions and values assessment for all proposed wetland impacts requiring a permit; mitigation of all fill in Preserve category wetlands; and specifying by management classification stormwater discharge pretreatment, buffer, hydroperiod, and other wetland standards.
  3. Require that wetland losses in the Schutz Lake subwatershed be mitigated within the Schutz Lake subwatershed.
  4. Track wetland losses resulting from permitted fill.
  5. Update the Functional Assessment of Wetlands to maintain a current inventory of wetland location, size as well as function and value.
  6. Restore degraded wetlands in Key Conservation Areas to improve vegetative diversity and ecological integrity, with priority given to wetlands where restoration could improve management classification to at least a Manage 1.  Restore other wetlands as opportunities arise.
  7. Restore vegetative diversity and ecological integrity of all wetlands in which the District acquires an interest.

Goal 11.2 - Schutz Lake

Increase the quantity, quality, and biological diversity of Schutz Lake subwatershed watersheds through the restoration of impacted wetlands.

Actions

  1. Consider the restoration of a series of wetlands in the central upper subwatershed that have high to moderate restoration potential and if restored could provide improved and connected habitat through the center of the subwatershed for future connection to Schutz Lake.  These include D-116-23-07-023, D-116-23-18-001, and D-116-23-18-013 (see Figure 14).
  2. Restore other hydrologically impacted wetlands in Key Conservation Areas determined in the FAW to be ?restorable,? where restoration could improve vegetative diversity and ecological integrity. 

4.12 Groundwater

Goal 12 - Groundwater

Protect and maintain existing groundwater flow, promote groundwater recharge and improve groundwater quality and aquifer protection.

Discussion

Maintenance of groundwater recharge is important in the Schutz Lake subwatershed to maintain hydrology to the groundwater-fed discharge wetlands in the central subwatershed as well as to recharge aquifers that supply public and private drinking water wells.  Development, with the associated creation of new impervious surface, increases the volume of stormwater runoff and reduces the amount of stormwater that naturally percolates into the soil to recharge groundwater. 

Increased infiltration in the Schutz Lake subwatershed is desirable for two primary reasons: to reduce the amount of pollutant loading into Schutz Lake, and to protect the hydrology of the large discharge (groundwater-fed) wetlands in the subwatershed.  Many of those wetlands are key resources with high ecological values that are dependant on groundwater to maintain those functions and values.  Much of the subwatershed has at least moderate infiltration potential.  Requiring new development and redevelopment to infiltrate some of the new stormwater generated would reduce new volumes downstream and help reduce future erosion in streams and channels; minimize new pollutant loading that would have been conveyed by that stormwater; and help maintain groundwater levels, preserving wetlands. 

Some parts of the subwatershed are areas of aquifer sensitivity or are potentially drinking water wellhead protection areas, where care should be taken when infiltrating stormwater.  Proper design of infiltration practices is necessary to avoid groundwater contamination.  Other land use practices such as the use of private water wells or individual sewage treatment systems, or agricultural practices such as the use of chemicals and handling of animal waste should be monitored to prevent contamination of groundwater resources.

Groundwater management in the Schutz Lake subwatershed will focus on increasing the amount of infiltration in the subwatershed, and minimizing opportunity for groundwater contamination from land use practices.

Desired Outcomes: Maintain function of existing groundwater flow, assist in the protection of drinking water supply, no degradation in surficial groundwater quantity or quality.

Metrics:

  • Acre-feet volume abstraction
  • Surficial groundwater levels and parameters

Goal 12.1 - Schutz Lake

Protect and maintain groundwater recharge and groundwater quality.

Actions

  1. Amending existing or establish new District rules requiring abstraction of the first one inch of rainfall on new permitted development and redevelopment.
  2. Establish new District rule requiring an additional level of analysis and review of permitted development and redevelopment where there is a potential to adversely impact groundwater connected to a surface water feature.
  3. Require pretreatment of stormwater discharged to wetlands or infiltration areas in the in the areas of high aquifer sensitivity.
  4. Coordinate stormwater and groundwater management within identified drinking water management areas and wellhead protection areas with city and private wellhead protection plans.
  5. Develop infiltration strategies appropriate to wellhead protection areas and areas of groundwater sensitivity.
  6. Work cooperatively with Carver County, the Minnesota Department of Health, and other agencies charged with managing individual sewage treatment systems and private and public groundwater wells to assess the potential impacts of surface water management practices on groundwater quality.
  7. Provide assistance to LGUs and developers to foster low impact development and redevelopment that minimizes new impervious surface and provides for increased infiltration
    1. Develop and distribute model ordinances and design standards that incorporate low impact design principles
    2. Sponsor educational opportunities for LGU staff, developers, elected and appointed officials and other interested parties to provide practical information and opportunities for sharing experiences.
  8. Require developers to identify drain tile lines on property proposed for development.
  9. Identify a network of surficial aquifer monitoring wells across the entire Minnehaha Creek watershed, monitor groundwater levels and groundwater quality, and if change is detected identify strategies for addressing that change.

4.13 Floodplains

Goal 13 - Floodplains

Reduce the severity and frequency of flooding and high water by preserving and increasing the existing water storage capacity below 100-year flood elevations on all waterbodies within MCWD.

Discussion

Flood Insurance Studies have identified no floodplain in the Schutz Lake subwatershed. However, managing stormwater flows within this subwatershed is still important to help reduce the severity and frequency of localized flooding within the subwatershed. The primary strategy in the management of stormwater in the Schutz Lake subwatershed is the preservation of the existing stormwater storage provided by wetlands. Additional storage could be provided through the creation of depressional storage areas on new developments.

Desired Outcomes: No net loss of wetland storage.

Metrics: Acres net wetland fill.

Goal 13.1 - Schutz Lake

Preserve the existing water storage capacity.

Actions

  1. Minimize development in low-lying areas.
  2. No net loss of the large wetland complexes that provide substantial upstream stormwater storage within this subwatershed.
  3. Encourage the development and maintenance of depressional storage within the subwatershed.

Goal 13.2 - Schutz Lake

Utilize District hydrologic and hydraulic data to identify potential public infrastructure high water impacts.

Actions

  1. The HHPLS noted that the 100-year water level was predicted to overtop the culvert outletting the wetland north of Schutz Lake. This culvert is in poor condition. Local plans should identify these observed or potential locations and assess whether the risk of occasional flooding is acceptable or should be addressed. Assist LGUs in determining specific impacts and potential improvements.

4.14 Recreation

Goal 14 - Recreation

Promote the recreational use, where appropriate, of surface waters within MCWD by providing recreation opportunities for citizens by promoting the use and enjoyment of water resources with the intent of increasing the livability and quality of life within the watershed.

Discussion

Schutz Lake is the primary recreational water resource in this subwatershed, although wetlands provide aesthetic enjoyment, wildlife viewing, and other recreational values. The Carver Park Reserve abuts Schutz Lake and provides recreational opportunities, although no access is provided to the lake. District and other efforts to improve ecological integrity and conserve corridors will enhance those aesthetic and recreational values across the subwatershed. The District's primary strategies in promoting and supporting recreational use of Schutz Lake is by improving water quality to support swimming and fishing, and managing aquatic vegetation.

Desired Outcomes: Manage surfaces waters to achieve water quality goals so designated use is maintained and unimpaired.

Metrics:

Goal 14.1 - Schutz Lake

Support Schutz Lake recreational use by meeting the State's aquatic recreation standard of 40 ?g/L summer mean total phosphorus through the implementation of the programs and projects identified in this plan to reduce phosphorus loads and improve Schutz Lake water quality.

Goal 14.2 - Schutz Lake

Support the Schutz Lake fishery through the implementation of the programs and projects identified in this plan to maintain ecological integrity and promote shoreline restoration.

4.15 Erosion Control

Goal 15 - Erosion Control

Control temporary sources of sediment resulting from land disturbance and identify, minimize and correct the effects of sedimentation from erosion-prone and sediment source areas.

Discussion

Erosion within the subwatershed can result in sediment being transported to lakes, wetlands, and streams, where it can degrade water quality and habitat. Sediment accumulating in channels, culverts, and other facilities can reduce their ability to convey stormwater, while erosion can undermine their stability.

Restoration of lakeshore with native vegetation would help increase or maintain infiltration rates; decrease or maintain runoff rates and pollutant conveyance to water resources; help create fish and wildlife habitat; and help minimize erosion. Identifying, addressing, and preventing erosion is necessary to meet District goals as well as to meet state and federal nondegradation, water quality and biological integrity requirements and to prevent the need for future TMDLs.

Requiring new development and redevelopment to infiltrate some of the new stormwater generated would reduce post-development volumes downstream and help reduce future erosion in streams and channels; minimize new pollutant loading that would have been conveyed by that stormwater; and help maintain groundwater levels, preserving wetlands.

Strategies in the Schutz Lake subwatershed will focus on identifying erosion problems and working with LGUs to correct them, as well as considering potential downstream impacts of new volumes discharged from development.

Desired Outcomes: Reduction in pollutant loading of temporary and permanent nature from erosion to supplement other goals.

Metrics:

  • In-lake nutrient concentrations/Trophic State Index Scores (TSI) for Schutz Lake Nutrient loading goals (lbs) for Schutz Lake
  • Linear feet of shoreline protected in Key Conservation Areas
  • Linear feet and width of riparian areas protected in Key Conservation Areas

Goal 15.1 - Schutz Lake

Identify and address erosion problems in the subwatershed.

Actions

  1. Identify, inventory, and prioritize erosion problems in the subwatershed.
  2. Work cooperatively with LGUs to address identified erosion problems.
  3. Regulate new development and redevelopment and ensure compliance with erosion control standards.

Goal 15.2 - Schutz Lake

Manage water volumes to the channel draining the upper subwatershed to prevent further erosion.

Actions

  1. Implement the regulatory and management activities identified in this plan.
  2. Inspect this channel periodically to assess its condition.
  3. Work cooperatively with the City of Victoria to reduce stormwater volumes to prevent erosion and sediment transport and stabilize to streambanks as necessary.

4.16 Regulation

Goal 16 - Regulation

Promote effective planning to minimize the impact of development and land use change on water resources as well as achieve watershed District Goals.

Discussion

The District's regulatory program is the means by which many of the goals enumerated here would be accomplished. As development and redevelopment occurs, property owners and developers are required to treat and control stormwater, limit impacts to wetlands, and meet other standards. Additional regulation may be necessary in the Schutz Lake subwatershed to implement the actions in this plan.

Desired Outcomes: Utilize regulatory program to cost-effectively manage land use to achieve other goals.

Metrics:

Goal 16.1 - Schutz Lake

In consultation with LGUs through an appropriate rulemaking process, amend existing or adopt new rules to implement the actions identified here within two years of adoption of this plan.

Actions

  1. Amend District rules as set forth in this Plan within two years of adoption of this plan.
  2. Provide technical assistance to LGUs in the implementation of existing or new rules.
    1. Develop and distribute model ordinances and design standards that could be used to implement existing or new rules.
    2. Sponsor educational opportunities for LGU staff, developers, elected and appointed officials and other interested parties to provide practical information and opportunities for sharing experiences.
  3. Promote ?Conservation Ordinances? related to low-impact development, tree conservation, open space conservation, etc.

4.17 Public Involvement

Goal 17 - Public Involvement

Solicit input from the general public with the intent that policies, projects and programs will address local community values and goals as well as protect historic and cultural values regarding water resources; strive to manage expectations; base decisions on an educated public; foster an educated and informed public within the watershed.

Discussion

The District has good working relationships with the LGUs within the watershed, and maintains a Citizens Advisory Committee to obtain regular public input on issues of concern to the District and its citizens. As the District implements the actions identified in this plan, including the education and communication actions described above, it will be important to obtain direct input from water resource users. The primary strategy for the Schutz Lake subwatershed will be fostering the development of a Schutz Lake Association.

Desired Outcomes: Engage the public to encourage involvement in District activities and stewardship of area resources.

Metrics: Development of Lake Association and interest groups.

Goal 17.1 - Schutz Lake

Promote the development of a Schutz Lake Association.

Actions

  1. Provide information and organizational assistance.
  2. Attend meetings as requested to share information, hear concerns, and maintain a good working relationship.

5.0 Implementation Program

The goals set forth in Section 4.0, Resource Management Goals and Strategies will require an integrated set of programs and projects oriented toward the conservation and improvement of water resources within the watershed.  The following sections describe generally the activities that will be undertaken by various parties.  Table 15 in Section 5.9 provides a cost estimate and schedule for the District's responsibilities for new activities in the implementation program.

5.1 Regulatory Program

As discussed in Section 3.6 above, future development is expected to contribute additional stormwater volume and phosphorus loads to Schutz Lake, further degrading water quality.  The current regulatory program will not be sufficient to control these impacts.  To mitigate these future impacts and to address other goals such as increased infiltration, wetland management, and improved ecological integrity, additional regulation may be necessary.  A decision on rulemaking needs/standards can only be made after the formal rulemaking process.  In addition, further amendments to the rules should not be precluded by the content of the plan.

Additional regulatory controls on permitted development and redevelopment will be considered for this subwatershed to increase phosphorus load reduction requirements, add volume management and infiltration requirements, implement wetland management in accordance with management classification, and increase scrutiny of development that may impact groundwater or key conservation resources.  Regulations providing an incentive such as a volume reduction credit to developers to maintain undisturbed areas, reforest, or plant native vegetation may be considered.

The following are revised or additional regulatory controls in this subwatershed that would be necessary to assist the District in meeting the goals of this Plan:

  1. Amend existing or establish new District rules requiring abstraction of the first one inch of rainfall on new permitted development and redevelopment.
  2. Amend existing or establish new District rules requiring greater than 50 percent phosphorus removal on new permitted developments within the Schutz Lake subwatershed.
  3. Provide regulatory constraints and incentives for the conservation of undisturbed native vegetation as sites develop.
  4. Amend District rules to incorporate a requirement for stormwater management plan approval prior to submittal of a preliminary plat.
  5. Amend existing or establish new District rules requiring submittal of a functions and values assessment for all proposed wetland impacts requiring a permit; mitigation of all fill in Preserve category wetlands; and specifying by management classification stormwater discharge pretreatment, buffer, hydroperiod, and other wetland standards.
  6. Establish new District rule requiring an additional level of analysis and review of permitted development and redevelopment where there is a potential to adversely impact groundwater connected to a surface water feature.
  7. Require pretreatment of stormwater discharged to wetlands or infiltration areas in the in the areas of high aquifer sensitivity.

5.2 Land Conservation Program

Key conservation areas are identified on Figure 19.  The District will provide technical assistance to the LGUs to identify and implement strategies for local conservation efforts in support of program goals.

5.3 Education Program

The District operates a watershed-wide Strategic Education and Communications program that provides general watershed information as well as targeted information.  The targeted education and public input activities identified in this plan, including promotion of a Schutz Lake Association, will be implemented to assist in the reduction of existing pollutant loading to Schutz Lake and other water resources in the subwatershed as well as to minimize the impacts of future development.  The specific targeted messages will emphasize actions to maintain the current water quality of Schutz Lake and prevent degradation, and conservation of the vegetated shoreline.

5.4 Monitoring and Data Collection

Hydrologic Data Program

To monitor progress toward meeting water quality and quantity goals, monitoring of Schutz Lake will continue to be a part of the District's annual program.

Aquatic Vegetation

Lake aquatic plant monitoring provides information needed to manage aquatic plants, evaluate control measures, and plan for future actions.  This monitoring is especially useful as water quality management activities are implemented and plant communities change in response to changing water quality.  A baseline aquatic vegetation and shoreline survey will be conducted and an aquatic vegetation management plan developed.  The estimated cost of preparing this plant is $10,000.  The survey will be updated by staff/contractor every five years at an estimated cost of $7,000.  Interim monitoring could be conducted by trained volunteers.

5.5 Operations and Maintenance

Activities detailed in this implementation plan will require new ongoing operations and maintenance activities in this subwatershed.  Construction of a regional treatment pond will require ongoing inspections, maintenance, and sediment removal.  Future potential restoration of wetlands will require ongoing inspection and vegetation maintenance.

Table 10.  Potential ongoing operations and maintenance tasks and responsible parties for proposed Schutz Lake improvement projects.

TaskTreatment PondsWetland RestorationsStream RestorationsSpringSummerFall
Routine InspectionxxxEarly and After StormAfter StormLate and After Storm
Vegetation Management xxAs neededAs neededAs needed
General Upkeepxx RegularlyRegularlyRegularly
Debris and Trash Removalx  As neededAs neededAs needed
Inlet/Outlet Cleaningxx As neededAs neededAs needed
Minor Erosion RepairxxxAs neededAs neededAs needed

Note: Responsible parties would be determined by negotiation at the time of project proposal

5.6 LGU Requirements

5.6.1 Local Government Unit Subwatershed Phosphorus Load Reductions

Part of the phosphorus load reduction plan for Schutz Lake is a required reduction of the phosphorus load contributed by existing land uses.  The requirement is a 15 percent reduction in loading from existing residential land use; 25 percent from existing agricultural use; and 10 percent from other developed land use.  This reduction can be accomplished through: application of BMPs such as additional street sweeping, local water quality ponds, rain gardens and infiltration swales that reduce erosion or treat runoff; prevention of future load increases through the conservation of lands previously identified for development; or achieving load removals in excess of  the minimum required.  The LGUs identified below must identify in their local water management plans specific steps to accomplish these minimum reductions.  The LGUs must also annually report to the District their progress toward accomplishing this requirement.

Table 11.  Allocation of Schultz Lake subwatershed LGU Phosphorus Load Reductions (lbs/yr).

Subwatershed Unit

Victoria 

All

14

TOTAL

14

5.6.2 Land Conservation

A key element in achieving overall ecological integrity goals in the Schutz Lake subwatershed is the conservation of key ecological areas, including high-value wetlands and connecting uplands.  LGUs must identify in their local water management plans the areas shown on Figure 19.  The local plan must also identify strategies the LGU will undertake to protect the ecological values of those areas.  These may include such strategies as land use regulation; acquisition and management; conservation easements; ecological restoration; and property owner education regarding land management strategies to maintain ecological integrity.

5.7 Phosphorus Load Reduction

One of the water quality goals for this subwatershed is the achievement of the Schutz Lake in-lake phosphorus concentration goal of 40 ?g/L.  Reduction of phosphorus loads from the subwatershed to achieve that goal will require the combined efforts of the regulatory program, operational programs, and capital projects.  Table 12 below sets forth a summary plan for how this could be accomplished.

The table breaks down modeled phosphorus loading in the subwatershed by source: atmospheric deposition, external sources, and internal sources.  Atmospheric deposition is a regional issue and is not dealt with here.  The primary means of addressing external loading are through the regulation of new loads generated by development and the reduction of existing loads.  The HHPLS identified a 14 pound upstream load reduction that could be achieved through the general application of BMPs to residential and agricultural land, such as phosphorus-free fertilizer, rain gardens, infiltration basins, agricultural BMPs, shoreline restorations, and retrofit projects.

Application of the current regulatory program to new development would also reduce the expected load from ultimate development conditions.  As Table 8 above indicates, more stringent regulation of new development could significantly reduce the need for or size of capital projects.  A detention pond at the outlet of subwatershed unit SL-2 could provide a significant phosphorus load reduction.  As shown in this plan, it is sized to provide the removal necessary should no changes be made to the regulatory program.

Table 12.  Phosphorus load reduction plan for Schutz Lake.

Source 

Reduction 

Ultimate Phosphorus Load [lb/yr]

 

Planned Reductions [lb/yr]  

Final Loading [lb/yr]  

  

Atmospheric 

 Atmospheric deposition

NA

25

NA

25

 

External Loads 

 External load determined

 from modeling land use

 

242

 

 

  

 

 LGU load reduction allocation (Table 11)

 

14

 

 

 

 Existing regulations

 

54

 

 

 

 Schutz Lake Wet Detention Pond

 

56

 

S of Hwy 5

(50% of 112 lb)

 Total After Reductions

 

 

 

118

 

Internal / "Unknown" Loads 

 Internal / "unknown"

 loads determined from   

 modeling land use

 

83

 

 

  

 

NA

 

-

 

 

 Total After Reductions

 

 

 

83

 

Total Load 

 TOTAL 

 

350

124

226

  

 LOAD GOAL  

 

 

 

226

 

 DIFFERENCE 

 

 

 

0

 

5.8 Capital Improvement Program

The capital improvement program identified below includes projects that will progress the District toward achieving its various goals for the subwatershed.  This program is not a comprehensive list of all capital needs or potential projects within the subwatershed, and is limited by available financial resources and staff capacity to manage projects.  These priority projects are intended to:

  • Achieve nutrient load reductions in Schutz Lake to prevent future listing as Impaired Waters that require TMDL studies.
  • Stabilize channels with erosion issues that may be degrading downstream water quality.
  • Begin addressing the historic loss of wetlands in the subwatershed through restoration of degraded or drained wetlands.
  • Mitigate the impacts of future development on downstream resources.

These proposed projects emphasize the achievement of multiple objectives.  For example, stream restoration would not only stabilize streambanks and prevent further erosion, it would provide an opportunity to add buffers and improve habitat, conserve existing high-value resources, and reduce sediment and nutrient transport downstream.  Wetland restorations would not only restore degraded or drained wetlands, they would provide an opportunity to increase infiltration, improve habitat, and conserve existing high-value resources.

5.8.1 Schutz Lake Wetland Detention Pond

ProjectConstruction of a stormwater treatment pond to treat runoff to Schutz Lake
DescriptionThe phosphorus reduction plan for Schutz Lake requires a reduction of 124 pounds of phosphorus per year from the subwatershed. A wet detention pond is proposed for consideration at the outlet of SL-2 (see Figure 20), which drains subwatersheds SL-1 and SL-2. This pond would be designed to remove at least half the phosphorus load projected to be contributed by those drainage areas under the ultimate development conditions.
OutcomeThis pond could remove an estimated 56 pounds of phosphorus annually, along with other pollutants such as sediment.
Estimated Cost
Design, easement acquisition,
construction, and project management.
Funding source is the District capital levy.
$ 126,500 Design, ROW
$ 1,002,100 Construction
$ 1,128,600 Total
Schedule 

2013 Design, easement acquisition

2014 Construction

5.8.2 Schutz Lake Corridor Wetland Restoration

Project

Schutz Lake Corridor Wetland Restoration

Description

Restoration of drained or degraded wetlands in the Schutz Lake subwatershed

Need

Two wetland projects in the subwatershed would be considered for restoration to restore hydrology, improve habitat, increase infiltration, expand wildlife corridors or connect other high-value resources.   Prioritization and selection of specific restoration projects would be based on criteria including:

  • Potential to achieve multiple objectives such as improving downstream water quality, increasing infiltration, increasing stormwater storage, improving habitat, or connecting other resources
  • Opportunity to increase wetland acreage through restoration of drained wetlands

 

The following are some of the potential restoration locations that might meet those criteria, although other locations may also be considered.

 

Upper Channel Corridor.  A 24 acre wetland complex in the upper subwatershed is part of a proposed habitat corridor from the southern subwatershed to Schutz Lake.  Currently stormwater pond and degraded wetland, restoration and buffering would provide a significant ecological improvement and anchor the corridor.  The site is adjacent to Holy Family Catholic High School, and could potentially provide an outdoor classroom experience for the school.

Lower Channel Corridor.  The proposed wet detention pond above would be located within a 10 acre complex downstream of the above wetland.  Restoration of this partially drained complex could provide an opportunity to restore wetland acreage, buffer the channel, and connect the upper corridor with a corridor leading to Schutz Lake and to Carver Regional Park Reserve 

 

Outcome

Restored and improved wetland functions and values, enhanced habitat, increased infiltration, expanded and connected wildlife corridors, protection of downstream resources.

Estimated

Cost

Design, easement acquisition, permitting, construction, construction management, vegetation management contract.  Funding source is the District capital levy.

$  46,400  Design

$310,800  Construction

$357,200  Total

 

Schedule

2010  Wetland identification, design, easement acquisition

2011  Construction

5.8.3 Regional Infiltration

Project

Schutz Lake Regional Infiltration

Description

Implementation of opportunities to increase infiltration, including but not limited to construction of infiltration basins and devices, wetland restoration, reforestation, revegetation

Need

The proposed rule requiring new development and redevelopment to infiltrate one inch of rainfall would capture approximately 70 percent of new runoff volume from the watershed.  The remaining 30 percent would continue to convey pollutants to Schutz Lake and other resources in the watershed.  To minimize this pollutant loading and to minimize new stormwater volumes generated from the subwatershed, regional infiltration opportunities such as wetland restoration, underground storage and infiltration, or native vegetation restoration and reforestation may be necessary.

 

Prior to implementing any of these options, opportunities in the subwatershed should be investigated for the most cost-effective and suitable locations.  Regional infiltration will be focused on those subwatershed units that are expected to see significant new runoff volumes between 2000 and ultimate development.

Outcome

Minimized new pollutant loads conveyed by runoff; minimized new volumes generated by new development; protection of wetland and surficial groundwater hydrology; wetland restorations; conservation of high-value native vegetation and habitat.

Estimated

Cost

Project 1: Improvements in SL-1.  Funding source is District capital levy.

$123,700

Project 2: Improvements in SL-2.  Funding source is District capital levy.

$134,100

Project 3: Improvements in SL-3.  Funding source is District capital levy.

$51,800

Schedule

2014:  Identify and construct improvements in SL-2

2014:  Identify and construct improvements in SL-3

2016:  Identify and construct improvements in SL-1

5.8.4 Land Conservation

Project

Schutz Lake Subwatershed Land Conservation Activities

Description

Implementation of Land Conservation program activities in the Schutz Lake subwatershed, including but not limited to acquisition of conservation easements or fee title to land as well as facilitating partnerships, encouraging conservation planning and activities, providing technical assistance, and education and outreach.

Need

The Land Conservation Program is an integral strategy to achieving the goals in this subwatershed plan.  Land conservation activities help to maintain and improve ecologic integrity, surface and groundwater quantity and quality, wetlands integrity, and streambank stability.  High priority areas are located in this subwatershed, including areas with high ecological values. Conservation of key land cover types may be beneficial to reducing runoff and associated pollutant transport, preserving high-infiltration areas, conserving native vegetation, conserving habitat and natural resource corridors, and improving ecologic integrity.

Outcome

Minimized new pollutant loads conveyed by runoff; protection of wetland and surficial groundwater hydrology; wetland restorations; conservation of high-value native vegetation and habitat.

Estimated

Cost and Funding

Estimated cost to achieve conservation goals in the Schutz Lake subwatershed 2007-2017

$24,000

District capital levy

Schedule

Implement both proactively and as opportunities arise during the period 2007-2017

5.9 Summary

The following tables summarize the proposed implementation action items and their relationship to the problems and issues identified in section 3.0 above, the metrics by which the District will be evaluating progress toward resolving hose issues and problems, the estimated District cost of implementing those actions, and anticipated implementation schedule.

Table 13.  Problems and issues identified in the Schultz Lake subwatershed and actions proposed to address them.

 

Problem or Issue

Actions in Implementation Plan

Degree of Improvement

Water Quality

The water quality in Schutz Lake scores in the B grade range and nearly meets its TP concentration goal of 40 ?g/L. 

  • A phosphorus load reduction plan for Schutz Lake that sets forth actions to maintain or reduce loading to maintain or improve in-lake P concentration goals.  These actions include LGU requirements to reduce phosphorus from existing development, and regulatory requirements to minimize load from new developments.
  • Continue monitoring Schutz Lake to evaluate trends in water quality. 

Implementation of all the actions in the phosphorus load reduction plan would protect existing water quality.

 

Development and redevelopment in the subwatershed will increase nutrient and TSS loads from the watershed as well as increase the volume of stormwater runoff.

Rules will be amended to add a volume management requirement on new development and redevelopment to reduce pollutant transport.

Would depend on ability of developers to incorporate adequate BMPs on their projects and properly maintain them to sustain removal efficiencies.

Water Quantity

The HHPLS identified locations where outlets and culverts require maintenance.

LGUs directed to evaluate these locations as part of their local water management planning.

Completed as LGUs complete their local plans.

Development, redevelopment, and reconstruction in the subwatershed, is predicted to increase volume of stormwater runoff from the watershed as well as increased nutrient and TSS loads. 

Rules will be amended to require a volume management requirement.

Would depend on ability of developers to incorporate adequate BMPs on their projects and properly maintain them to sustain removal efficiencies.

 

Further development in the southern subwatershed could increase volumen and velocity of discharge conveyed by the channel that drains the central part of the subwatershed.

  • Rules will be amended to require a volume management requirement.
  • District will consider a cooperative project with LGU to stabilize channel.

Depends on extent of problem and ability to develop cooperative or collaborative improvements.

The HHPLS predicted that the outlet of the wetland north of the lake would overtop during 100 year or larger events.

LGUs directed to evaluate these locations as part of their local water management planning.

Completed as LGUs complete their local plans.

Wetlands

The subwatershed includes large Preserve classification wetlands that provide a high level of water quality protection to downstream water bodies.

  • Key Conservation Areas identified that include high-value wetlands.  In key areas, LGUs are required to include in their local plans strategies for conserving these values.
  • Rules will be amended to establish management standards based on management classification for impacts to wetlands from development and redevelopment.

 

  • Ongoing effort that is dependant on property owner willingness to pursue conservation and LGU plan completion.
  • Implementation of revised rules would help minimize future impacts to the highest-value wetlands while still providing a measure of protection to those that provide mainly downstream resource protection.

Wetlands with high to moderate restoration potential should be considered for protection and restoration.

  • Several potential wetland restorations are identified for potential collaborative restoration.
  • Wetlands identified as being of high to moderate wetland potential would be managed according to a Manage 1 wetland classification if they have been assessed as a Manage 2 or 3.   This would minimize further degradation that might make future restoration more difficult or costly.

Depends on extent of problem and ability to develop cooperative or collaborative improvements.  This would begin to mitigate wetland losses from past development and help to increase the quantity and quality of wetlands present.

Ecologic Integrity

Wetland and associated upland areas with high ecological value are present and should be conserved and connected to provide wildlife corridors.  An ecological corridor is identified through the central subwatershed.

 

Key Conservation Areas identified that include high-value wetlands.  Some of these areas are identified as District priorities for continued implementation of the Land Conservation Program, and thus the District would proactively look for opportunities to conserve these resources. The Capital Improvement Program includes funds for Land Conservation Activities.   In key areas, LGUs are required to include in their local plans strategies for conserving these values.

Ongoing effort that is dependant on property owner willingness to pursue conservation, District budget and staff capacity, and LGU plan completion.

The Schutz Lake fishery has not been surveyed since 1991.  The survey should be updates to better evaluate the fishery and how it is impacted by water quality.

 

Work cooperatively with the DNR on its fishery management efforts.

Would depend on ability to coordinate and collaborate with the DNR.

No detailed information is available on aquatic vegetation in Schutz Lake.

Plan includes development of an aquatic vegetation management plan.

Completion of this plan would provide a plan for future activities by the District, LGUs, DNR, lake association, and other interested parties.

Groundwater

The FAW concluded that most the large wetlands in the subwatershed were discharge or combination discharge/recharge.  Increased infiltration in the southern subwatershed may be required to help preserve that hydrology as that area develops.

  • Amend rules to require infiltration or abstraction of the first one inch of rainfall on new permitted development and redevelopment.
  • Identify a network of surficial aquifer monitoring wells across the watershed, monitor groundwater levels and quality.
  • Promote Better Site Design (Low Impact Development) principles for new development that mimic predevelopment hydrologic regime.

 

Infiltration on site will assist in preventing further modification of surficial groundwater recharge and help to maintain wetland hydrologic regimes.

 

There is a high aquifer sensitivity area in the northern subwatershed where any stormwater should be pretreated prior to discharge.

  • Amend rules to require pretreatment of stormwater discharged to wetlands or infiltration areas in the areas of high aquifer sensitivity.
  • Establish a new District rule that requires an additional level of analysis and review of permitted development and redevelopment where there is a potential for development to adversely impact groundwater connected to a surface water feature.

Will help minimize future impacts to groundwater and provide for proactive management rather than reactive

Stormwater management should be coordinated with wellhead protection plans.

 

Stormwater and groundwater management within those areas will be coordinated with wellhead protection plans.

Will help minimize future impacts to drinking water and provide for proactive management rather than reactive

Table 14.  Summary of metrics to be used in evaluating progress toward Schultz Lake subwatershed goals.

Objective

Metric

Existing

Desired

Location

Water Quality

Phosphorus Loading (lbs annually)

350 (Ultimate)

226

Schutz Lake

Water Quantity

Volume Reduction Acre-feet

-

67

Watershed-wide

1.5 year discharge

28.3

28.3

Watershed-wide

100 year discharge

42.3

42.3

Watershed-wide

Ecologic Integrity

Key Conservation Areas conserved (acres)

 

3

Watershed-wide

Wetlands

Wetland Acreage

238.4

238.4 or greater

Watershed-wide

54.5

54.5 or greater

Preserve

2.1

2.1 or greater

Manage 1

60.4

60.4 or greater

Manage 2

20.5

20.5 or greater

Manage 3

Table 15.  Summary of Schutz Lake subwatershed implementation program.

Item

Description

Estimated Cost

Schedule

Section 3.0

MCWD Capital Projects

1

Wet detention pond

$1,128,600

2014

3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.2, 3.2.3, 3.3.2, 3.4.1

2

Corridor wetland restoration

$357,200

2011

3.1.2, 3.3.2, 3.4.1,

3

Regional infiltration

$123,700

2016

3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.2, 3.2.3, 3.4.1, 3.5.1

$134,100

2014

$51,800

2014

MCWD Data Acquisition/Study

1

Aquatic and shoreline vegetation survey and management plan

$10,000

$7,000 update

Part of ongoing watershed-wide program

3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.4.2, 3.4.3

2

Identify keystone, umbrella, and indicator species, evaluate habitat, and develop conservation strategies

Part of watershed-wide study

2010 and ongoing

3.3.1, 3.3.2, 3.4.1, 3.4.2, 3.4.3

3

Inventory and prioritize erosion problems

Part of watershed-wide study

Part of ongoing watershed-wide program

3.1.2, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 3.2.3

MCWD Land Conservation Program

1

Undertake land conservation efforts in accordance with Figure 19

$24,000

Part of ongoing watershed-wide program

3.3.1, 3.3.2, 3.4.1, 3.5.1

MCWD Regulatory Program

1

Amend District Rules to increase stormwater runoff requirements for new development and redevelopment

Part of watershed-wide effort

2007-2009

3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.2

2

Amend District Rules to require abstraction of 1? of rainfall  on new development and redevelopment

Part of watershed-wide effort

2007-2009

3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 3.2.3, 3.2.4, 3.3.1, 3.5.1 – 3.5.3

3

Amend District Rules to adopt wetland management rules based on wetland management classification

Part of watershed-wide effort

2007-2009

3.3.1, 3.3.2, 3.4.1, 3.5.1, 3.5.2

MCWD Hydrodata Program

1

Monitor Schutz Lake

Part of watershed-wide hydrologic data program

Part of ongoing watershed-wide program

 

3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.2, 3.2.3

2

Identify shallow wells to monitor groundwater levels

Part of watershed-wide study

2008 and ongoing

3.2.2, 3.3.1, 3.3.2, 3.4.1, 3.5.1

MCWD Education/Communication Program

1

Provide targeted education materials to key stakeholder groups to meet objectives of plan

Part of watershed-wide education program

Part of ongoing watershed-wide program

3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.2, 3.2.3, 3.3.1, 3.4.1, 3.5.1, 3.5.2

2

Provide workshops, seminars, and brown bags for LGU staff, developers, and other interested parties

Part of watershed-wide education program

Part of ongoing watershed-wide program

3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 3.2.3, 3.2.4, 3.3.1, 3.3.2, 3.4.1, 3.5.1, 3.5.2, 3.5.3

3

Develop and distribute model ordinances and design standards that incorporate low impact design principles

Part of watershed-wide education program

Part of ongoing watershed-wide program

3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.2, 3.2.3, 3.3.1, 3.3.2, 3.4.1, 3.5.1, 3.5.2, 3.5.3

4

Promote the development of a Schutz Lake Association

Part of watershed-wide education program

Part of ongoing watershed-wide program

3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.2, 3.2.3, 3.3.1, 3.4.1, 3.4.2, 3.4.3

5

Recruit and train volunteers to monitor vegetation in Schutz Lake

Part of watershed-wide education program

Part of ongoing watershed-wide program

3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.2, 3.4.2, 3.4.3

6

Develop a small grant program to provide financial assistance to property owners desiring to implement BMPs on their property or to install demonstration projects on public property

Part of ongoing watershed-wide program

2008 and ongoing

3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 3.2.3, 3.2.4, 3.3.1, 3.5.1 – 3.5.3

MCWD Operations and Maintenance

1

Inspect channels every five years

Ongoing activity

Part of ongoing watershed-wide program

3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 3.2.3

2

Maintain detention pond to sustain removal efficiency in accordance with cooperative agreement

Incorporate into life-cycle cost of project

Part of ongoing watershed-wide program

3.1.1, 3.1.2

Collaborative Projects

 

None identified.

 

 

 

Figures